3rd IHC International Conference in Heritage Management

Conference Logo
Elefsina, Greece

30th September-2nd October 2016

3rd IHC International Conference in Heritage Management
30th September-2nd October 2016
Elefsina, Greece

The Initiative for Heritage Conservation (IHC) is honoured to invite you to participate in its 3rd International Conference in Heritage Management. The conference will take place in Εlefsina under the auspices of Aeschylia Festival, the leading cultural institution of the city, at “Paleo Eleourgio” (Old Oil Factory), from 30 September to 2 October 2016.

For more information please write to inherity dot conference at gmail dot com.

The conference is free for all members, and you can become a member in this registration form.

Membership fees and benefits are explained here.

The aim of the conference is the discussion and development of best practices in heritage management through case studies from all around the world in key fields such as heritage conservation and digitization, public engagement, education and legal protection.

International professionals and academics, with distinguished presence in their respective field, will deliver keynote speeches in each thematic session. Within the conference framework side events (The HerMa Market, Street Art Workshop, Captured Landscapes) will encourage an interactive dialogue of the participants with the sector of cultural heritage as well as the multifaceted landscape of Elefsina.

With anticipation for your support and participation,

The Organising Committee

 

 Scientific topics

  1. General Assembly: Managing Heritage Resources
  2. Preservation of Heritage Values and Cultural Significance:
    Landscape Archaeology.
  3. Public Engagement in Heritage Studies:
    Local Communities and Archaeology.
  4. Return and Restitution of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin.
  5. 3D Digital Tools for Heritage Management.
  6. Education and Heritage:
    Dynamic Tools for Communicating Heritage Values.

 

Important dates

  • Submission of abstracts: 15th July 2016
  • Submission of .ppt/.pdf presentations: 15th September 2016
  • Conference: 30th September-2nd October 2016

The abstract committee will have regular meetings accepting abstracts on a first-come first-serve basis

 

Keynote Speakers

  • Mr. Mike Corbishley, formerly Head of Education, English Heritage, now Senior Lecturer in Heritage Education, UCL Institute of Archaeology, London.
  • Prof. Vassilis Ganiatsas, Professor of Theory, Philosophy and Practice of Architectural/Urban/Landscape Design, National Technical University of Athens.
  • Prof. Richard Hodges OBE, President of The American University of Rome.
  • Prof. W. Fred Limp, former President elect of the Society for American Archaeology, Professor in Geoinformatics, Department of Geosciences, University of Arkansas.
  • Emeritus Prof. Colin Renfrew (Lord Renfrew of Kaimsthorn), formerly Disney Professor of Archaeology and Director of the McDonald Institute, Cambridge University.
  • Dr. Tim Williams, Reader in Managing Sites, University College London.

ORGANISING & SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

Organised by

Initiative for Heritage Conservation (IHC)

 

Institutional Partners

Aeschylia (Αισχύλεια) Festival

MA in Heritage Management (HERMA)

Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB)

University of Kent

Municipality of Elefsina

Elefsina 2021

 

Organising Committee

Foteini Giannoulidi, MA, Initiative for Heritage Conservation

Theodosia Maroutsi, MA, Initiative for Heritage Conservation

 

Scientific Committee – Session Moderators

  1. Vassilis Ganiatsas, Professor of Theory, Philosophy and Practice of Architectural/Urban/Landscape Design, National Technical University of Athens.
  2. Aris Anagnosotpoulos and Dr. Lena Stefanou, IHC Public.
  3. Irini A. Stamatoudi, Attorney at Law, Director of the Intellectual Property Organization of Greece, Ministry of Culture and Sports/ Director of the Hellenic Copyright Organisation. IHC Law.
  4. Evangelos Kyriakidis, Senior Lecturer for Aegean Prehistory, University of Kent.
  5. Mike Corbishley, Formerly Head of Education, English Heritage, now Senior Lecturer in Heritage Education, UCL Institute of Archaeology, London.

SESSION ABSTRACTS

  • Preservation of Heritage Values and Cultural Significance: Landscape Archaeology

Prof. Vassilis Ganiatsas,

Professor of Theory, Philosophy and Practice of Architectural/ Urban/Landscape Design, National Technical University of Athens.

Archaeological Cultural Landscapes constitute an extreme case in heritage conservation as they represent a double identity, cultural and natural.

As currently treated in conservation practices, are being treated as cultural objects of just a larger scale in comparison with other monuments. Yet, they considerably differ not in scale but basically in kind and subsequently they need a different conceptual framework for their proper protection, enhancement and management.

Archaeological cultural landscapes represent an inherent discontinuity between their cultural and natural attributes and thus they thus render difficult their merging in establishing an overall cultural significance that could guide their proper management.

  • As cultural constructs, they appear to be self-fulfilled and thus appealing to be appreciated for what they are, as ends in themselves. No matter how they are being conceptualized and culturally accommodated at different times by different stakeholders, their main characteristic resides in their maintaining a distinct and independent individuality.
  • As parts of the natural environment, they appear beyond the human cultural reach. No matter how they are being used, appropriated, interpreted and changed by cultural activities across time, they maintain a permanent externality as to all possible interpretations and cultural accommodations.

In this session we seek papers that will propose new ideas, concepts and methods of identifying values, establishing cultural significance and managing Archaeological Cultural Landscapes as a distinct case of heritage management. Contributions aiming at the articulation of a new approach could range from analysis of pertaining theoretical issues to showcasing of concrete examples.

 

  • Public Engagement in Heritage Studies:
    Local Communities and Archaeology

Dr. Aris Anagnosotpoulos and Dr. Lena Stefanou,

IHC Public

Community Archaeology already has an established record especially in the Americas and Australia. An ever-growing literature offers a variety of approaches, experiences and proposed blueprints for scholarly engagement with communities of stakeholders.

The practical application of community programs is however severely curtailed by institutional, legal and ideological (meaning local, nationalistic etc positions) considerations in areas such as Greece, where the ancient remains of the past are central to the grounding of the national state and the imagined national community.

Thus, many recommendations of good practice that may be valid for other settings become obsolete for small-scale projects that have neither the means nor the leverage to bypass serious institutional and social barriers to their goal of opening archaeology to the public. This is a two-way relationship that impinges on the knowledge, attitudes and political strategies of local communities, as well as the ideological and practical constitution of archaeology officials, archaeological teams and non-expert individuals working with them.

Αim of this session is to discuss a vision for public archaeology as it can develop in those very common places where remains of the ancient past are somewhat marginal to the heritage industry and unlikely to have a significant impact on the livelihoods of local populations. Moreover, it attempts to examine the impact of long-term engagement through archaeological ethnography towards the transformation of heritage management issues into a tool for civic engagement, collaborative work, sustainable development and community control of local knowledge.

 

  • Return and Restitution of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin

Dr. Irini A. Stamatoudi,

Attorney at Law, Director of Intellectual Property Organization, Ministry of Culture and Sports/ Director of the Hellenic Copyright Organisation.

This session will examine issues pertaining to the return and restitution of cultural property to its countries of origin according to international treaties, EU or other regional legal instruments, national law, softlaw instruments, custom and practice. It will also examine cases of illegal removal of cultural property both in times of peace and in times of war. Discussion will also take place with regard to the main principles and trends as they stand today in cultural property law, the role of museums, collectors and auction houses, their responsibilities and role, as well as the mentalities in the area.

 

  • 3D Digital Tools for Heritage Management

Dr. Evangelos Kyriakidis,

Kent, Senior Lecturer in Aegean Prehistory.

Digital tools for Heritage Managers. The heritage manager is no longer alone when it comes to recording a site. Ground penetrating technologies, 3D technologies, underwater technologies all can collaborate to create a mosaic of information that can be used for multiple purposes. However these technologies, besides their continuous improvement, are not always used as a standard practice, they are used in a patchy way, and are not mature enough to be used for many of the standard jobs of the heritage manager. This session hopes to bring to the fore such issues of interconnectivity, use and standardization of digital technologies aiming to help the heritage manager to navigate through a difficult, challenging yet most promising horizon.

 

  • Education and Heritage:
    Dynamic Tools for Communicating Heritage Values /
    Archaeological Education: A Dynamic Tool for Communicating Heritage Values

Mr. Mike Corbishley,

Formerly Head of Education, English Heritage, now Senior Lecturer in Heritage Education, UCL Institute of Archaeology, London./ Honorary Senior Lecturer in Heritage Education University College London Institute of Archaeology, UK – Senior Lecturer MA Heritage Management, University of Kent-Athens University of Economics and Business, Elefsina, Greece

Education initiatives in many countries have concentrated on introducing archaeology to young people, mainly through activities in museums or on ancient monuments. This has been reflected in schools where it is generally linked to the curriculum. Now we need to encourage teachers to see archaeology as a means of supporting social values and create activities and resources which fit into curriculum areas such as social studies and citizenship.

 

 

  1. INVITED SPEAKERS

Mr. Mike Corbishley                                         

Formerly Head of Education, English Heritage, now Senior Lecturer in Heritage Education, UCL Institute of Archaeology, London.

Mike Corbishley has spent his working life promoting heritage education in a variety of ways; teaching in schools and in adult education, training teachers, encouraging adults and children to take an active part in archaeology. He helped set up the Young Archaeologists Club in 1972 and is still involved as a leader in the Institute’s branch. He was appointed the first education officer at the Council for British Archaeology in 1977 and went on to join the education department of English Heritage in 1984. During his time at English Heritage he was also the Head of Interpretation and was responsible for commissioning the interpretation scheme at Down House.

When he retired from his post of Head of Education he joined the Institute of Archaeology in 2003 as a lecturer in heritage education and principal consultant in education in the Centre for Applied Archaeology, UCL. He is responsible for the education programmes and resources for the Institute’s major research project at Ancient Merv in Turkmenistan. He has written a number of books for children and teachers about archaeology, the heritage and the ancient world. He has also contributed papers to professional journals and was responsible for commissioning the extensive Education on Site series for teachers while at English Heritage.

Prof. Vassilis Ganiatsas                                     

Dipl. Arch. Eng.-M. Arch NTUA, Ph.D. (Εdinburgh 1987).
Professor of Philosophy, Theory and Practice of Architectural Design &
Director –‘Architectural Morphology Lab’, at the School of Architecture, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA).
Researches / publishes / teaches (1984-1987, Univ. of Edinburgh / UK and since 1989 at NTUA):  ‘Philosophy / Theory / Studio of Architectural / Urban / Landscape Design’ and ‘Philosophy, Planning and Design for Architectural, Archaeological and Cultural Landscapes Heritage Management’.
His Architectural/Urban Design projects have been awarded with 17 prizes in National/European Competitions and the 2010 EUROPA NOSTRA Medal for Architectural Preservation.  Invited Professor in many schools of architecture in Europe, US and Japan.

Expert member – ICOMOS International Scientific Committees THEOPHILOS (Theory and Philosophy of Conservation) and ICOMOS-ICIP (Interpretation and Preservation of Cultural Heritage Sites).

Prof. Richard Hodges OBE

President of The American University of Rome

Pr. Richard Hodges is the President of The American University of Rome since 2012. He began his career as an archaeologist with excavations in his home village of Box, Wiltshire while at high school. During that time he founded a village archaeology society, which is thriving today. He studied archaeology and history at Southampton University where he completed a doctorate on the archaeology of Dark Age trade. In 1976 he joined Sheffield University as a lecturer and while there launched excavations in England and Italy at Roystone Grange (Derbyshire), Montarrenti (Tuscany) and San Vincenzo al Volturno (Molise). From 1988-95 he was Director of the British School at Rome, during which time he enlarged the excavations at San Vincenzo al Volturno with support from the Abbey of Monte Cassino, and joined the Butrint Foundation as its scientific director (1993-2012) to launch new excavations and site management strategies at the World Heritage Site of Butrint (Albania). From 1996-98 he was Director of the Prince of Wales’s Institute of Architecture, then from 1998 he has been Professor in the School of World Art Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich. During this period, he served in the Ministry of Culture in Albania (1999), as adviser to the Packard Humanities Institute during the Zeugma (Turkey) excavations (2000), and as Williams Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (2007-12).Dr. Hodges is a Board member of the Istituto Packard, Italian affiliate of the David & Lucile Packard Foundation.

He has been Visiting Professor at SUNY-Binghamton (1983), the University of Siena (1984-87), the University of Copenhagen (1987-88) and the University of Sheffield (2006-7). He was awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the Queen’s honours in 1995.

Emeritus Prof. Colin Renfrew (Lord Renfrew of Kaimsthorn)

Formerly Disney Professor of Archaeology and Director of the McDonald Institute, Cambridge University

Andrew Colin Renfrew, Lord Renfrew of Kaimsthorn, is an archaeologist and paleolinguist, notable for his work on radiocarbon revolution, the prehistory of languages, archaeogenetics, and the prevention of looting at archaeological sites. In 1972 Renfrew became Professor of Archaeology at the University of Southampton. During his time at Southampton he directed excavations at Quanterness in Orkney and Phylakopi in Greece. In 1973 Renfrew published Before Civilisation: The Radiocarbon Revolution and Prehistoric Europe in which he challenged the assumption that prehistoric cultural innovation originated in the Near East and then spread to Europe.

In 1981 he was elected to the Disney Professorship of Archaeology in the University of Cambridge, a post he held until he retired in 2004. In 1990 Renfrew was appointed as Director of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. He served as Master of Jesus College from 1986 till 1997, and was awarded the prestigious Balzan Prize in Prehistoric Archaeology in the year of his retirement from the University. He was awarded a life peerage in 1991, and chose the title “Lord Renfrew of Kaimsthorn”. Colin Renfrew is the author of scores of books and articles.

Dr. Tim Williams                                                        

Senior Lecturer in Managing Sites, University College London

Tim Williams is a Senior Lecturer in the Institute of Archaeology at University College London. His research is focused on urbanism, space syntax, complex societies, recording and analysis of complex stratigraphy, integration of complex data sets, management of archaeological sites, cultural landscapes, and world systems. He is presently the director of the Merv Archaeological and Site Management project (Turkmenistan) and the co-director of Beirut Souks Excavations (Lebanon). He is interested in Roman, Levantine, Islamic, and Central Asian archaeology. Recently working on the UNESCO serial transboundary Silk Roads project, including undertaking the ICOMOS Silk Roads thematic study.